Recent Articles, Engaging Families, Celebrating Early Intervention

Fall in Love with Your Job All Over Again

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. So how does that pertain to your job as an early interventionist?shutterstock_87066047

The life of an early interventionist is packed with conducting assessments and developing IFSPs, managing lots of paperwork, and traveling here and yon all over the countryside for visits with children and families. PHEW! It makes me tired thinking about it!

In all this busyness how often do you step back and consider the importance of your job? Do you really think about the impact that you have on a daily basis in the lives of children and families?

A Foundation that Lasts a Lifetime

Frequently early intervention providers are so focused on the day in and day out routines, just trying to keep their noses above water, that they fail to recognize what amazing services and supports they provide.  Even more importantly, with the narrowed emphasis on those first three years of life, there is limited time to pause to consider that early intervention is building a foundation that lasts a lifetime!

When I provided direct services it infrequently crossed my mind about the longterm implications of my interactions with families. Sure, I wanted to provide the best supports as possible but I was more focused on the present: the child’s IFSP outcomes and progress, providing good information to help families make good decisions, etc.  Rarely did I reflect on how my work on that Tuesday morning might impact some Tuesday morning later in life when the child was in elementary school or even in high school.

Recently, however, in my current job as a professional development specialist, our team has focused on producing videos that will support early interventionists in their work. I had the opportunity to spend several wonderful days with a young man who was in the early intervention program that I served as the director many years ago. Brandon, now fourteen years old, and his family shared where their lives have taken them since they transitioned out of early intervention. Brandon’s mother, Rhonda, discussed the impact of those early services that laid the framework for lifelong inclusive practices and advocacy.

I am proud to say that I am an early interventionist. Even more importantly, Brandon and Rhonda reminded me that I LOVE MY JOB! Honestly, no words I write could speak the volumes that this video provides.  I encourage you to grab a cup of coffee or a colleague and take a moment to watch. I know you will remember why you love your job.

Brandon’s Story, A Mother’s Voice

Happy Valentine’s Day! 

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To brighten your day even further, check out the Virginia Early Intervention Professional Development Center’s Resources and Info for Families page for three more success stories from Virginia families!

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4 Comments to “Fall in Love with Your Job All Over Again”

  1. Dana,

    I am a former montessori teacher who is fairly new to the early intervention profession. I am really enjoying the individual time with the children and their families. It is providing an experience, as you described, that is difficult to put together in words but just so rewarding. I wake up each morning so grateful to have found this job, this path that I’ve always dreamed of! Thank you for posting this beautiful video to remind us how beautiful all children are and how important our jobs are!

    I really enjoy reading this blog!
    Valerie

    • You’re very welcome, Valerie! It is an awesome job, isn’t it?! I’m glad to hear that you’re enjoying the blog. If you have ideas for topics that would help you as a new interventionist, just let me know. Good luck with your new career! 🙂

  2. Beautiful!. Music and love makes a great pair, needed as much as air and water to thrive. Thanks for the gift.

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